Neorealism
Neorealism is an art movement that was developed in the visual arts in the middle of the 20th century in a number of European countries and in the United States,…

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Metarealism
Metarealism (came from the Greek meta - between, after, through, and gealis - material, real) is the realism of many realities connected by the continuity of metabolic transformations and state…

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Art Nouveau
Art Nouveau (came from the French moderne - the newest, most modern) - style in European and American style on the shore of the XIX-XX centuries. Art Nouveau reinterpreted and…

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Monthly Archives: January 2018

Avant-gardism

Avant-gardism (from the French avant-garde – advanced detachment) – a set of experimental, modernist, emphasized unusual, exploratory endeavors in the art of the 20th century. The avant-garde directions are: Fauvism, Cubism, Futurism, Expressionism, abstractionism, surrealism, actionism, pop art, conceptual art.

At different historical stages, the role of the avant-garde was played by successive currents: 1900-1910. – the time of the appearance of Fauvism, Cubism, Futurism, Expressionism, Dada, abstract art; in the 1920-1930s. Surrealism comes to the fore, in the post-war period, new trends of abstractionism arise – abstract expressionism, Tashism, informal art, etc .; 1960-1970s – the transitional era from the “classical” avant-garde to neo-avant-garde, or postmodernism with its components – actionism, pop art, conceptualism, kinetic art and other artistic art practices. Continue reading

Abstract expressionism

Abstract expressionism (Eng. Abstract expressionism) – a trend in abstract art that arose in the United States in the 1940s. and represented mainly by a flock of artists of the so-called New York School. Taking its roots in the early works of V. Kandinsky, partly in expressionism and adaism, abstraction expressionism was formed under the influence of surrealism and its fundamental principle of mental automatism, perceived by American artists from European artists who emigrated overseas during the Second World War: P. Mondrian, A. Breton, S. Dali, M. Ernst, R. Matt.

Following surrealism, abstract expressionism continued to “liberate” art from any control of the mind and logical laws, setting as its goal the spontaneous expression of the artist’s inner world, his subconscious in chaotic, abstract forms and taking as his main creative principle the spontaneous, automatic application of paints to the canvas, occurring solely under the influence of mental and emotional states. Continue reading

Abstractionism

Abstractionism (from Latin abstraction– distraction, removal) is one of the directions in the art of the 20th century, the essence of which was the complete rejection of the depiction of real objects and phenomena in painting, drawing and sculpture. Abstractionism arose on the basis of such currents as cubism, futurism and expressionism. Some areas of abstractionism (Suprematism, neoplasticism) differed in ordered designs from lines, geometric shapes and volumes of various colors. And such a direction as tashism was rather a reflection of the spontaneity and unconsciousness of creativity in the dynamics of volumes and spots. Abstractionism sought to “harmonize”, the creation of certain color combinations and geometric shapes, so that the beholder formed certain associations. The date of abstractionism can be considered 1910, it was then that its founder V.V. Kandinsky presented the first abstract work in the history of art in Munich and wrote a treatise on the Spiritual in Art, where he substantiated his own creative methodology with scientific discoveries. Continue reading

Underground
Underground (from the English underground - underground, underground) is a series of artistic trends in contemporary art that oppose themselves to mass culture and the mainstream. The underground rejects and…

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Neoplasticism
Neoplasticism is one of the earliest varieties of abstract art. Created by 1917 by the Dutch painter P. Mondrian and other artists included in the association "Style". According to its…

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Decadence
Decadence (from French decadence or from Latin decadentia - decadence) is a direction in literature and art of the late XIX - early XX centuries, characterized by resistance to public…

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Luchism
Luchism (rayonismus, from the French.rayon - ray) is an art school in Russian art of the 1910s, associated with the names of Mikhail Larionov and Natalia Goncharova. In 1913, at…

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