Abstractionism
Abstractionism (from Latin abstraction– distraction, removal) is one of the directions in the art of the 20th century, the essence of which was the complete rejection of the depiction of…

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Classicism
Classicism (derived from the Latin classicus - exemplary) is an artistic style and aesthetic trend in European literature and art of the 17th - beginning of the 19th centuries, one…

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Analytical art
Analytical art is an artistic method developed and justified by Pavel Filonov in theoretical works (“Canon and the Law”, 1912; “Paintings Made”, 1914; “Declaration of the World Prosperity”, 1923) and…

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Cubofuturism

Cubofuturism is a trend in the art of avant-garde in the early twentieth century, combining the achievements of Italian futurists and French cubists. In the visual arts, cubofuturism arose on the basis of a rethinking of the art theories of Cezannism, Cubism, Futurism and Russian neo-primitivism, revealing an eclectic phenomenon with a bright national color. The new aesthetics (the second name is “Russian Cubism”), which existed for a short period of time – from 1911 to 1916, served as a transitional stage from the artistic searches of the early twentieth century. To the largest trends and truly original creations of the Russian avant-garde – Suprematism of K. Malevich, constructivism of V. Tatlin and E. Lisitsky, analytical art of P. Filonov.

The first picture in the spirit of cubofuturism by Malevich was presented at the Target exhibition in 1913. She and the subsequent works of D. Burliuk, I. Klyuin, A. Exter and other cubo-futurists were semi-abstract compositions depicting geometric shapes close to “machine” rhythm (cylinders, cones, casings, etc.)

The art of cubo-futurists was most fully represented at two avant-garde exhibitions – “Tram B” in February 1915, and “0.10”, which took place in December 1915 – January 1916, where Malevich first exhibited paintings in the spirit of Suprematism. Actively collaborating with futurist poets from the Gilea group (A.Kruchenykh, V.Khlebnikov, E. Guro), the cubo-futurists received from them many innovative artistic and aesthetic ideas, for which they earned the nickname “abstruse realists”. This term emphasized the absurdity and alogism of cubo-futuristic compositions, however, the “Zaumi” apologist Kazimir Malevich considered this a specific feature of Russian cubism, arguing that “logic always put a barrier to new subconscious movements and to free oneself from prejudices, the course of alogism was put forward”. In fact, cubofuturism was the first to develop the aesthetics of the absurd, which subsequently formed the basis of Dadaism and surrealism.

Masters of cubo-futurism: Kazimir Malevich, David Burliuk, Ivan Klyuin, Alexandra Exter, Natalya Goncharova, Nadezhda Udaltsova, Lyubov Popova, Olga Rozanova, Ivan Puni.

Arte povera
Arte povera (ital. Arte povera - poor art) - the direction of the avant-garde that took shape in Italian art in the late 1960s and early 1970s. and widely used…

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Neo-pop
Neo-pop, neo-pop art or post-pop is a trend in modern painting that arose in the 80s of the XX century as a reaction to conceptualism and minimalism. Neo-pop is not…

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Anachronism
Anachronism (from the Greek. Ana - back and hronos - time), another name - hyper-Mannerism - one of the directions of postmodernism, offering an author's interpretation of the art of…

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Kinetic art
Kinetic art - (came from the Greek. Kineticos - driving) - the trend in modern art, associated with the widespread use of moving objects, which is based on the idea…

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