Empire
Empire (from the French. Empire - empire) - a style in architecture and decorative art that arose in France at the beginning of the 19th century, during the First Empire…

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Orphism
Orphism (French orphisme, named after the character of the ancient Greek mythology of the singer Orpheus) is a trend in European painting of the 1910s, close to cubism and futurism.…

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Abstract expressionism
Abstract expressionism (Eng. Abstract expressionism) - a trend in abstract art that arose in the United States in the 1940s. and represented mainly by a flock of artists of the…

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Hyperrealism, photorealism, superrealism

Hyperrealism, photorealism, superrealism – a style in painting and sculpture, based on the photorealization of the object. Hyperrealism arose in the USA in the middle of the 20th century. The main goal of hyperrealism is to show reality.

Hyperrealism (eng. Hyperrealism – superrealism; other names – superrealism, photorealism, cold realism, radical realism) is an artistic direction in painting and sculpture that arose in the USA in the 1960s and spread in the 1970s. in Europe.

Being a form of figurative art, hyperrealism is based on thorough accuracy and detail in reproducing reality that mimics the specifics of photography. The works of hyperrealists are detailed photographs enlarged to the size of a large canvas.

Some artists who worked in this direction actually used photographs and color slides as the basis for their work. At the same time, all the features of the photo image were preserved, for which the artists used mechanical copying techniques: slide projection, glaze, an airbrush instead of a brush, an emulsion coating, etc. The use of such technologies was not accidental: it emphasized mechanism, eliminated the human presence from the creation process, as if trying to prevent the artist’s own, personal vision of the world. Perhaps that is why the world of hyperrealism seems inanimate, cold, super-reality detached from the viewer.

The goal of hyperrealism is the depiction of everyday realities, and the main topics are the depersonalized mechanized life of the modern city, the depersonalized living system in a tough and rough world. His subjects are deliberately banal, and the images are emphasized “objective”. Cars, houses, restaurants, gas stations, telephone booths, billboards and rarely living people are “street characters” whose images are ironic or full of hopelessness. The image of reality grows in the paintings, but not real, but reflected in its multiplicity in glass shop windows, in polished car bodies, polished to a brilliance granite. The game of these reflections, accurately reproduced by the artist, creates the impression of the interpenetration of spatial zones, an intricate correlation of plans, disorienting the viewer, giving rise to a sense of surrealism.

Masters of hyperrealism: Don Eddie, Richard Estes, Chuck Close, Ralph Goings, Malcolm Morley, Mel Ramos, Audrey Flack, Robert Cottingham, Ben Schonzite, Zhdon de Andrea, Dwayne Hanson, Graham Dean, Michael English, Michael Leonard.

Divisionism
Divisionism (from the French division - division), pointillism - the direction of neo-impressionism, writing in separate clear strokes in the form of dots or small squares. The mixing of colors…

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Art Deco
Art Deco (from the French art deco, abbr. From decoratif) - a direction in art in the middle of the 20th century, which marked the synthesis of avant-garde and neoclassicism,…

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Metarealism
Metarealism (came from the Greek meta - between, after, through, and gealis - material, real) is the realism of many realities connected by the continuity of metabolic transformations and state…

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Cubofuturism
Cubofuturism is a trend in the art of avant-garde in the early twentieth century, combining the achievements of Italian futurists and French cubists. In the visual arts, cubofuturism arose on…

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