Metarealism
Metarealism (came from the Greek meta - between, after, through, and gealis - material, real) is the realism of many realities connected by the continuity of metabolic transformations and state…

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Gothic
Gothic (from Italian. Gotico - unusual, barbaric) is a period in the development of medieval art, covering almost all areas of culture and developing in Western, Central and partly Eastern…

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Impressionism
Impressionism (from French impression - impression) is a trend in European painting that originated in France in the mid-19th century. Impressionists avoided all the details in the drawing and tried…

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Neo-impressionism

Neo-impressionism – (French neoimpressionisme) – a kind of post-impressionism; the artistic direction in painting that arose in France around 1885, the main theorist and inspirer of which was Georges Seurat.

Developing the artistic and aesthetic principles of late impressionism, which showed an increased interest in optical phenomena in nature, neo-impressionists sought to bring to a logical conclusion the empirical findings of their predecessors based on scientific achievements, to convey with the help of pictorial techniques all the wealth of optical effects.

The main pictorial method of the new trend was divisionism – a system based on the purposeful decomposition of a complex color tone into pure colors, which were applied to the canvas with separate strokes. Based on divisionism, Seurat and Signac developed an unusual writing technique – pointillism, which consisted in the fact that paints were applied to the canvas in the form of small dots and squares, which, when perceiving the painting from a certain distance, were optically merged into the viewer’s retina into the forms and images created by the artist.

For the first time, the canvases of neo-impressionists were shown in 1886 at the exhibition of the Salon of Independents and at the Eighth exhibition of impressionists, where they were ridiculed by critics and spectators, but received support from artists, especially Belgians (The Group of Twenty), who repeatedly invited Seurat and his followers to participate in their exhibitions.

The pointillist writing technique attracted the attention of both young artists (Cross, Luce, Lemmen, etc.) and the elder of the painting workshop Camille Pissarro, who came into a new movement with his son Lucien. However, it also became the reason that in the 1890s. many artists (in particular Pissarro and Luce) left the ranks of neo-Impressionists, feeling that pointillism fetters their individuality.

Extremely bright, contrasting, exquisitely beautiful paintings by neo-impressionists turned out to be somewhat abstract, coldly rational, devoid of immediate emotionality, a play of feelings, reminding more of decorative panels than paintings.

Masters of neo-impressionism: Georges Seurat, Paul Signac, Camille Pissarro, Lucien Pissarro, Henri Edmond Cross, Charles Teofil Angran, Maximilian Luce, Hippolytus Ptizhan, Georges Lemmen, Theo Van Risselberg, Giovanni Segantini.

The new materiality
The new materiality (German Neue Sachlichkeit) is an art movement in German art of the 1920s - early 1930s, which represented the tradition of neoclassicism in the general context of…

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Hyperrealism, photorealism, superrealism
Hyperrealism, photorealism, superrealism - a style in painting and sculpture, based on the photorealization of the object. Hyperrealism arose in the USA in the middle of the 20th century. The…

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Metaphysical paintin
Metaphysical painting - (from the Greek meta - after and phisika - nature, metaphysics - the science of spiritual phenomena inaccessible to experienced knowledge, the transcendental principles of the world)…

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Kitsch, kitsch
Kitsch, kitsch (from German kitsch - bad taste) is a term denoting one of the most odious phenomena of mass culture, a synonym for pseudo-art, in which the main attention…

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