Neo-impressionism
Neo-impressionism - (French neoimpressionisme) - a kind of post-impressionism; the artistic direction in painting that arose in France around 1885, the main theorist and inspirer of which was Georges Seurat.…

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Analytical cubism
Analytical cubism is the second phase of cubism, characterized by a gradual blurring of the differences between form and space and the disappearance of images of objects. In the paintings…

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Metaphysical paintin
Metaphysical painting - (from the Greek meta - after and phisika - nature, metaphysics - the science of spiritual phenomena inaccessible to experienced knowledge, the transcendental principles of the world)…

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Orphism

Orphism

Orphism (French orphisme, named after the character of the ancient Greek mythology of the singer Orpheus) is a trend in European painting of the 1910s, close to cubism and futurism. The term “Orphism” was invented by the poet and art critic Guillaume Apollinaire (Orphism as the culprit of Orpheus) to characterize the work of Robert Delaunay and publicly announced during a lecture on contemporary painting in October 1912. The proposed name, the poet apparently wanted to emphasize a particular musicality , intuitiveness, irrationality of abstract art Delaunay.

Subsequently, Apollinaire extended this concept to the work of cubists, Dadaists and artists of the Blue Horseman group (Kandinsky, Mark, Macke, Yavlensky), introducing a certain confusion into the essence of the concept itself.

Orphism is a local, short-lived stream in painting, represented by the names of Robert Delaunay, his wife Sonya Terk-Delaunay, Frantisek Kupka and their few followers, among whom the most prominent figures were Fernand Leger, Francis Picabia, Vladimir Baranova-Rossine. Continue reading

Analytical cubism

Analytical cubism is the second phase of cubism, characterized by a gradual blurring of the differences between form and space and the disappearance of images of objects. In the paintings of this period appear translucent, iridescent, intersecting planes, the position of which is not clearly defined. The arrangement of forms in space and their relation to large compositional masses are constantly changing. The result is a visual interaction of form and space. Analytical cubism was developed by artists from the Golden Section artistic association: Albert Gleize, Marcel Duchamp, Raymond Duchamp-Villon, Jean Metzinger and Jacques Villon.

In the paintings of this period, iridescent colors appear translucent intersecting planes, the position of which is not clearly defined. Continue reading

Ar brut
Ar brut (French Art brut - rough, raw art) is a trend in European art of the mid-twentieth century, the founder and leader of which was the French artist Jean…

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Art Deco
Art Deco (from the French art deco, abbr. From decoratif) - a direction in art in the middle of the 20th century, which marked the synthesis of avant-garde and neoclassicism,…

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Naturalism
Naturalism - (French naturalisme, from lat. Natura - nature) - a direction in literature and art that developed in the last third of the XIX century in Europe and the…

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Lyrical abstraction
Lyrical abstraction, lyrical-emotional, psychological abstractionism is one of the areas of abstract art, which is characterized by a desire for a direct expression of the artist’s emotional, mental states and…

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